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Nutritional Advice...

Nutritional Advice are specialists in group exercise programs and the benefits derived from monitored exercise. We realize the importance of nutrition in your quest for better health, fitness and weight loss.

That's why we've provided this useful information on our website. Every month, we'll be providing new advice, articles and recipes from Vicky Kuriel, a sports dietitian.




Health and Fitness

Healthy Recipe - At Last - Guilt Free Eating!




Health and Fitness

Nuts – Naturally Tasty and Good for You

While nuts were once thought of as a dieter's high-fat nightmare, they are now viewed as a healthy component of any diet. From helping to protect against heart disease and certain cancers, research continues to show that many health benefits can be obtained from eating nuts.

Nuts provide us with an array of nutrients that can be beneficial to our health; these include:

It is however important to keep in mind that nuts are however particularly high in fat (approximately 50% fat). Regardless of the type of fat, gram-for-gram, fat is particularly high in calories. It is therefore wise to limit your nut intake to approximately 1-2 handfuls per day.

Handy hints to help you include nuts in healthy appropriate amounts on a daily basis:

One final tip… when selecting nuts, opt for raw or dry roasted and unsalted.

Vicky Kuriel
BSc.(Exercise Physiology), Master of Nutrition & Dietetics (APD), Sports Dietitian

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Health and Fitness

Eat Breakfast like a king!

The saying goes ‘Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper’. I 100% agree with this philosophy and believe that a good, hearty wholesome breakfast can certainly give a fabulous kick-start to your day. The list of breakfast foods is endless and just as importantly most are quick and easy to prepare. Here are a few ideas and tips to get your day started the right way:

Grains

Many commercial breakfast cereals don’t cover all bases in terms of fibre, glycemic index, vitamin and mineral content. I therefore suggest using a commercial breakfast cereal as a base and then adding an assortment of grains, seeds and nuts. A fantastic example of this is LSA (Linseed, sunflower seed and almonds). The addition of fresh fruit such as berries or a banana, will add additional fibre and freshness to this choice. I recommend using low fat or skinny milk or a natural yoghurt as an alternative.

Smoothies

The combination of fresh fruit, yoghurt, milk/soy, grains and a raw egg is perfect for a nutritionally complete breakfast. Whizzed together this is an easy to prepare option and can even be consumed ‘on the run’ in your car or on the train. Carbohydrate, protein and fibre are all looked after in a single glass.

Smoothies

This is often a great option for the weekend, when time is a little more available. Whipping up an omelette consisting of 2 eggs, tomatoes, mushrooms and spinach and then serving on a piece of hearty heavy multigrain bread is a terrific start to a Sunday morning.

For the beginners

If you have never been a breakfast eater, I suggest starting with something small, for example a piece of fruit e.g. an apple or a banana. It is all about creating a habit and once you get yourself into the routine of eating something before you leave the house in the morning, you can begin adding other components such as yoghurt and then maybe even a sprinkle of muesli.
Variety is essential, so be sure to mix your breakfast option up and most importantly, enjoy!

Vicky Kuriel
BSc.(Exercise Physiology), Master of Nutrition & Dietetics (APD), Sports Dietitian

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Health and Fitness

Foods for Fabulously Radiant Skin

We spend precious time and money on a daily basis applying various beauty products to our skin in an attempt to look our best. However many of us are missing the key ingredients. The health of our skin is in fact very much dependent on what we put into our bodies rather than just what we apply to the outside. Here are three of my basic dietary tips to ensure your skin looks and feels more radiant than ever before.

Water

Water or adequate hydration is by far the most important ingredient to healthy looking skin. Dry dull lifeless looking skin is a sure sign that you are not receiving adequate water in your diet. Good hydration comes not only from drinking an adequate amount of fluid but also by eating foods with a high water content, such as fruit and veggies. Apply strategies to your day to ensure you are drinking enough. For example always carry a water bottle with you, have one on your desk at work, in the car and sip on it at regular intervals throughout the day.

Good Fats

Over the years fat has been labelled as a food to avoid or reduce in your diet. However this certainly does not apply to all fats. Monounsaturated fats such as those found in nuts, avocados, seeds and some vegetable oils are a healthy addition to any diet. Similarly, polyunsaturated fats found in fish oils, flaxseeds, soybeans and some nuts are equally as important. These good fats play a vital role in maintaining healthy skin. Include a variety of these foods as part of a well-balanced diet, your skin will thank-you for it.

Antioxidants

Foods rich in antioxidants have been touted as age-defying! Antioxidants will promote healthier, more youthful looking skin by protecting skin cells from the type of damage that can show up as signs of premature aging i.e. wrinkles. Antioxidants are found in an array of fruits and veggies, some examples include blueberries, raspberries, cranberries and tomatoes. Foods high in antioxidants should be included in your diet on a daily basis.

Vicky Kuriel
BSc.(Exercise Physiology), Master of Nutrition & Dietetics (APD), Sports Dietitian

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Health and Fitness

The Power of Red Foods

Brightly coloured food doesn’t just look appealing, often colour is an excellent signal that the particular food is home to many great nutrients. Red foods contain phytochemicals such as flavonoids and lycopene that scientists are beginning to discover have an array of health benefits. As we move into the warmer months many of the red fruits and vegetables listed below will become more readily available and therefore this is a great time to begin including them in your diet on a more regular basis. Here is a list of a few powerful red foods to add to your shopping list:

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are a super food and the benefits of tomatoes can be received whether they are eaten raw, cooked or even in sauces. They are low in calories and packed with nutrients such as lycopene, potassium, which is important for heart health and Vitamin C, which helps support skin integrity and immunity.

Red Capsicum

Include red capsicum raw in salads, grilled or on the BBQ, stir fried or even steamed, whatever your preference you will be receiving a good dose of health-enhancing nutrients. Potassium, Vitamin A, which is key for good vision and a good dose of Vitamin C are all packed into this super food.

Red Kidney Beans

Kidney beans, just like their legume cousins, contain large amounts of heart-healthy fibre, zinc, which supports reproductive health and wound healing and B vitamins, which are key for neurological function.

Strawberries

Strawberries are low-calorie and loaded with Vitamin C, potassium and folate. Fresh raspberries not only taste wonderful but are also an excellent source of fibre and are currently being studied for a certain phytochemical that may be linked to cancer prevention. Dried cranberries are a fantastic portable snack that combine perfectly with a few mixed nuts and sultanas.

There is an endless list of red whole foods that simply due to their bright red colour bring with them a wonderful supply of health-enhancing nutrients. Apples, pomegranates, watermelon and cherries are a few more examples. Aim to include a form of red food in your diet on a daily basis to claim your health benefits.

Vicky Kuriel
BSc.(Exercise Physiology), Master of Nutrition & Dietetics (APD), Sports Dietitian

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Health and Fitness

5 Steps to a Healthier You in 2011

Vicky Kuriel
BSc.(Exercise Physiology), Master of Nutrition & Dietetics (APD), Sports Dietitian

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Health and Fitness

Staying well hydrated through the summer months

Every little cell, tissue and organ in your body needs water. Your body depends on water for survival. Staying on top of your daily hydration needs will see you enjoying better health and functioning more optimally in your activities of daily living.

How much water do I need everyday?

Recommendations vary considerably but in reality each individual is different and therefore what is adequate for one might not be for another. Typical signs of dehydration include a dry mouth, fatigue, headaches, dizziness, darker urine or in more extreme cases little or no urine. During the summer months, fluid intake needs to be increased in order to avoid these symptoms. Hot humid weather can have a significant impact on your hydration levels.

Water is the best option for staying hydrated, however there are numerous drinks and foods that can help provide the water you need. Always be mindful that drinks such as fruit juice, soft drink and sports drinks can all add significant calories to your diet. It is advisable to keep these to a minimum. However if you intend on exercising at a high intensity for longer than a hour, sports drinks can become extremely useful. Sports drinks have been specifically formulated to help retain fluid more effectively than water and provide a good level of carbohydrate to assist in maintaining blood sugar levels. Fresh fruit and vegetables may also contribute to your hydration level as they have a high water content.

A few tips for staying well hydrated

Vicky Kuriel
BSc.(Exercise Physiology), Master of Nutrition & Dietetics (APD), Sports Dietitian

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Health and Fitness

Your Daily Plan towards a Healthy Heart

Keeping your heart in good shape is about eating the right kind of foods and exercising regularly. Here’s an example of a day that would have your heart thanking you come bedtime.

Kick start your day with one of the best foods for your heart, oats. During the cooler months a steaming bowl of rolled oats with banana or berries is most appealing. However in the warmer months why not try adding oats to a smoothie! Wizz together a handful of blueberries, half a banana, 2tbsp of natural yoghurt, a glug of lite soy milk and half a cup of oats.

The oats will add a boost of fibre and folate and will also thicken up your smoothie giving it an extremely appealing texture. Blueberries offer anti-oxidants including vitamin C and beta-carotene as well as calcium and potassium, all of which play a part in heart health. The soy milk is also heart healthy, adding niacin, folate, magnesium and vitamin B to your diet.

During the morning when you begin looking for a snack, reach for a handful of natural almonds. Almonds add a good boost of vitamin E, fibre and omega-3 fats to your diet, all of which are excellent for keeping your heart healthy.

As lunchtime roles around why not dig into a hearty bowl of brown rice, tuna and a variety of veggies. Brown rice offers valuable nutrients such as magnesium and fibre and tuna is an excellent heart food, packed fill with omega-3 fats and niacin.

Snacking on fruit during the afternoon may help you to avoid the 4pm slump. An orange is an excellent choice for pumping extra vitamin C, beta-carotene and potassium into your system.

A small glass of red wine may aid in unwinding and relaxing into your evening routine, it will also have a positive impact on your cholesterol.

Pack as many different veggies into your evening meal as possible. Carrots, asparagus, spinach and sweet potatoes are a few examples of vegetables that have properties towards keeping your heart healthy.

With a little exercise added in at some point during the day, you will be able to sleep easy knowing you have treated your heart well for the day.

Vicky Kuriel
BSc.(Exercise Physiology), Master of Nutrition & Dietetics (APD), Sports Dietitian

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Health and Fitness

Balancing Energy In and Out

What are Kilojoules (kj) or Calories?

Energy is measured in kilojoules (kj) or Calories. So when we talk of 'energy in' we mean 'kilojoules in' (the kilojoules in food). Maintaining a healthy weight range it is important to help minimise the risk of many lifestyle diseases such as heart disease, some cancers and Type2 diabetes. The best way to maintain a healthy weight is to match the energy you consume from food with the energy that your body uses up.

On average, the amount of kilojoules required daily is:

Age Male Female
12-15 years 10500 kj 9000 kj
16-18 years 12500 kj 9500 kj
Adults up to 60 years 11000 kj 9000 kj
Over 60 years 9000 kj 8250 kj

Source: NHMRC, Canberra. These figures are only an average for the Australian population. The actual need for individuals will vary considerable depending on how active they are, their body build, state of health, age, weight and height.

Energy in = Energy out

To maintain body weight you need to aim to have 'energy in'. How much energy you need depends on how active you are each day, and whether or not your body is still growing (i.e. children and adolescents). The human body is designed for movement and activity - with a need for occasional, regular stops for refueling and relaxation.

Energy Storage

What happens if you take in more energy than you need? The answer is simple - excess kilojoules will be stored as body fat.

The Best Energy Source

Your body prefers to use carbohydrate for energy to fuel your muscles and your brain. If there is not enough carbohydrate in the food that you eat, then your body will use fat for energy or as a last resort, protein. Fat and alcohol have almost twice the energy content of carbohydrate and protein - so it makes sense to go easy on them.

Source: www.nutritionaustralia.org

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Health and Fitness

Healthy you; healthy kids; healthy family

Many of us are juggling numerous activities on a daily basis in our lives. Trying to keep fit and maintain a healthy diet amongst work, family and lifestyle commitments can be quite a challenge. Making small realistic changes together with your family, partner or even a close friend can make these changes a lot easier to stick to for the long-term. Here is a list of 10 simple ideas that you can do together with your kids and/or partner to help make sure 2010 is a healthy fulfilling year for you all.

  1. Oats is a great way for anyone to start their day. It is packed full of fiber and vitamins and can help lower your cholesterol.

  2. Always eat the peel/skin of fruit and veggies e.g. apples, pears, potatoes and encourage your kids to do the same. This can significantly increase the fiber content in your day.

  3. Cooking and shopping with your kids is a great way to introduce them to a wide range of healthy foods.

  4. Whilst preparing dinner cut up a platter of fruit and veggies to keep in the fridge for the next day. Everyone eats more of these foods when they are readily available.

  5. Jazz up the taste of veggies with dips such as hummus, bean spreads and low fat dressing.

  6. For younger kids use smaller plates and bowls to help control portion sizes. This is also a great strategy to decrease adult portion sizes when trying to lose weight.

  7. Set goals in relation to your health, nutrition and fitness. Write these goals down and review them often.

  8. Salads are a great way to bulk up any meal. Always include a side salad and be as creative as possible when it comes to the contents of the salad – variety is the key to keeping things interesting.

  9. Plan your week’s meals ahead of time together with your kids/family and then shop accordingly. Involvement in decision making, planning and shopping is a great step towards long term health for kids.

  10. Incorporate fun activities into your family life such as walking the dog, play time at the park or a Sunday afternoon hike. Encouraging an active lifestyle is a great step towards long term health and fitness.

Vicky Kuriel
BSc.(Exercise Physiology), Master of Nutrition & Dietetics (APD), Sports Dietitian

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Health and Fitness

What Is Better: A Treadmill or Walking Outside?

Overview

Because time is often a factor, many people wonder which cardiovascular activity will give them the best workout for their effort. Walking outdoors is available to most people, though weather and location can be a limiting factor in some situations. Walking on a treadmill requires access to a treadmill, either in your home or at a fitness club. Though both workouts offer the benefits of walking, there are distinct advantages and disadvantages to each.

Function

Walking is an accessible activity: most everyone can do it. All you need is a pair of comfortable shoes. Because of this, walking is an attractive workout option for many individuals. Walking is also a low-impact activity; stress on the joints of the legs, hips and back is minimal. Those new to exercise are often attracted to walking because it does not require an additional skill or significant equipment. Individuals recovering from injury can also reap the benefits of exercise without less risk of reinjuring themselves.

Benefits of Walking Outside

Walking outdoors is simple exercise. Most people have access to sidewalks or local trails, making outdoor walking convenient and affordable. A brisk, 30-minute walk in your neighborhood is an excellent way to improve cardiovascular fitness. The varied terrain, combined with proprioception (the neural-muscular response to outside stimuli), keeps the brain engaged in the workout as well. Because the walking surface--whether it is concrete, grass or a trail--is slightly modified with each step, the walker must integrate these changing perceptions to maintain a comfortable stride.

Benefits of a Treadmill

A treadmill offers a variety of options to simulate outdoor walking when outdoor walking may be unavailable. Treadmills allow you to customize your workout: you can choose to walk hills on a treadmill, even if you live in a relatively flat area. Having access to a treadmill, either at home or at a fitness club, allows you to walk when extreme weather prohibits walking outdoors. The surface of a treadmill is more forgiving than a concrete or asphalt sidewalk, putting less strain on your joints.

Comparison

The surface of a treadmill is consistent, making it a great choice for injured walkers or even those new to exercise. On the other hand, a treadmill does not engage the brain's sensory receptors as completely as outdoor walking does. Additionally, you must overcome air resistance while walking outdoors. A high-quality treadmill is an expensive purchase. A gym membership may also be prohibitively expensive for some individuals. Walking outdoors is free, provided you can find a safe place to walk. For most people, however, the most important factor when choosing an exercise type is consistency. You will reap the benefits of exercise whether you walk outdoors or on a treadmill; the key is to walk regularly and briskly.

Considerations

The type of walking workout you choose should be based upon your own fitness goals. If you begin walking as a form of training for an outdoor event, such as a hike, you should try to mimic the event's conditions as much as possible. At the same time, outdoor walking is better for those who do not have access to a treadmill or enjoy changes in weather and natural terrain. Treadmill walking, on the other hand, is better for those who want to customize and track their workouts using a machine.

Sourced from livingstrong.com

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Health and Fitness

Three Common Nutrition Myths

  1. “I don’t need to worry about what I eat because I exercise a lot and my weight is okay”

    It is never okay to not take an interest in what you are putting into your body. Food is your fuel. If you are fuelling your body with high fat, low fiber, nutritionally poor food, your engine is not going to be operating at full tilt. The immediate impact of a diet high in fat and sugar and low in fiber and nutritionally rich foods are low energy levels, fatigue and possibly even greater likelihood of getting sick. In the long-term illnesses such as heart disease, certain cancers, type 2 diabetes and various bowel problems will be far more likely. There is never a good excuse to not eat well. Starting with a few small changes with the ultimate aim of a well balanced nutritious diet is a great goal for anyone to have.

  2. “Bread, potatoes and most carbohydrate-rich foods are fattening”

    Despite many fad diets calling for the elimination or reduction in carbohydrate-rich foods, these foods are extremely valuable and add an array of nutrients to our diets including carbohydrate, fiber, vitamins and minerals. Choosing the right kind of carbohydrate-rich food is the key. Low glycemic index foods including grainy breads, pasta, sweet potatoes and veggies are perfect to include on a daily basis. The key to long-term weight loss success is balance and moderation.

  3. “Red meat has no part in a healthy balanced diet”

    Red meat can be an extremely valuable food in our diets. When selecting red meat always choose cuts that are lean and trim all visible fat prior to cooking. Red meat is an excellent source of iron and zinc, B vitamins and protein. Once again moderation is the key; we only need approximately 100g of cooked beef, lamb, chicken or pork per day.

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Health and Fitness

Do you need snack therapy?

By Julie Upton, RD

No matter where you are, you can be sure there’s a snack close by. As a nation, we snack everywhere—in our home, office, car, gym, and even at church. There’s a Snack Count mobile device that counts your daily nibbles, and I’m sure there’s one to locate your favourite crunchy munchies. Even McDonald’s is in the snack category with its new snack wraps that happen to be more like a meal, with 260–340 calories a piece.

There’s a big downside to all this unabashed between-meal eating: empty calories. And many food experts believe that excessive snacking is contributing to our ever-expanding waistlines.

Need proof? A 2010 study from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, found that adults are now eating some 579 calories from snack foods daily, or almost a quarter of their daily calories.

The researchers tracked snacking patterns from the late 1970s through 2006 and found some disturbing trends. Up to 97% of adults snack daily, compared to 71% three decades ago. Snacks used to contribute 357 calories (14% of total caloric intake) a day, but those between-meal calories have increased by 222 calories. Most of us now snack more than twice per day, and the average calories of our snacks is a whopping 226 calories (totalling 579 calories each day).

If we grazed on fresh fruit and veggies, there would be no harm in all the noshing, but our current snack choices are loaded with calories but lacking in nutrients. Dessert-type foods, salty snacks like potato and tortilla chips, and sweetened beverages were the top three contributors of the snack calories in this study. Other popular snack items include nuts, alcoholic beverages, candy, fruit drinks, and sports drinks.

We are humans, not cattle

As adults, many of us eat before we are physically hungry, and we stop eating way after we’ve had enough. We have lost all the ability to regulate caloric intake based on our internal hunger cues, and we respond to our emotional and environmental cues.

Unlike cows and other animals that graze all day, humans are genetically programmed for eating then fasting for short periods of time. Getting back to a more “normalized” eating pattern that consists of breakfast, lunch, and dinner with a mid-morning and afternoon snack (100- 200 calories max) can help break this pattern of all-day eating.

Like a bad financial investment, the calories in most snack foods (Doritos, Famous Amos cookies) are worthless, so try some of my favourite healthy snacks. When snacking, try to combine protein, fibre, and fat, like an apple and peanut butter, yogurt and fruit, or carrots and hummus. But portion control is just as important as snack choices. Remind yourself what 200 calories looks like and adapt it to your favourite nibbles. Happy snacking!

Source: www.health.com/integrated solutions (Vital information with a human touch)

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Health and Fitness

Core muscles and core training

Core training is an essential part of any fitness program, but what do we mean by "core muscle strength" or "core training"? Is it just your abdominals that need a workout? What about your lower back muscles?

A lot of people think "core muscles" refers just to their front outer abdominal muscles, the ones that give you your six pack. But the "core" includes all the muscles of the trunk both, front and back, inner and outer, which help with stabilizing and moving the spine and pelvis. Having strong core muscles (also called trunk muscles or the "inner unit") that work together properly is important for all movement, from sports and dynamic movement to the basic functions of daily life. A strong core is a prerequisite for the prevention of injury, enhanced sports performance, improved balance, and proper training and muscular development. And of course a strong, well trained core will also help your stomach look flatter and toned! A six pack is very aesthetically pleasing, so read on to find out more about core muscle training and exercises!

Core muscles

Core muscles include any muscle that has a functional role to play with one of the five major postures: standing, sitting, lying on the back, lying on the stomach, or on hands & knees. This means that in addition to abdominal muscles, the greater core area is made up of all the muscles of the lower back and shoulder girdle, the internal and external oblique’s, pelvic muscles, transverse abdominus (TVA), gluteal muscles, and even hamstrings.


Therefore to maximize your core strength working just one or two isolated groups of muscles isn't enough. You need to focus on integrated training exercises that work several muscle groups together such as compound resistance exercises and challenging core & stability work. Swiss ball exercises are especially good for working the core because the unbalanced platform the inflated ball creates means more core muscles are recruited.

What do the core muscles do?

We now know where the core muscles are but why do we want to work them?

How do you train the core?

There are a number of different ways to strengthen your core muscles with exercises, and it depends on your starting level and your aims for core development. It is best to talk to a qualified personal trainer to see what sort of exercises is best for you, and to make sure you're doing them correctly. In general, you should aim to work on strengthening your core muscles three times per week for at least ten minutes per session if you want to notice a real difference. Focus on the quality of the core exercises rather than the quantity of repetition, and keep the speed slow and controlled. If you can do more than 25 reps of a core muscle exercise it's either too easy, your technique is not correct, or you are going too fast!

Core muscle exercises

Exercises for the core include prone holds, side holds, leg extensions, crunches, sit ups, oblique sit ups, oblique twists, back extensions, alternating arm and leg raises, supermans, plus a host of fitball exercises such as crunches, prone holds, russian twists, jacknives, hip bridges, hamstring curls and more. Don't forget that it's not just core specific exercises that strengthen your core muscles. You fitness training program should include compound resistance exercises such as squats, bench press, lat pull downs, and shoulder press to work the core muscles in a more dynamic method.

Complete Personal Fitness Training Manly Sydney Australia 2007.

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Health and Fitness

Nutrition and Immunity

The colder winter months are upon us and as the days get shorted and the air cooler so we all become more likely to develop a cold or pick-up a virus. Numerous studies have now been able to confidently identify a link between good nutrition and lifestyle habits and ones immunity. Below is a list of my top 7 tips to boost your immune system this winter and hopefully get to the summer months in good health and fitter than ever.

  1. Eat a sufficient amount: An extremely low calorie/kilojoule diet or simply not eating enough can compromise your immune system.
  2. Sleep:inadequate sleep is a certain way to compromise your immune system. It is recommended that we aim for 8 hours of sleep every night.
  3. Eat a variety of fruit and vegetables:Each fruit and vegetable provides a different combination of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. By consuming a variety every day you increase your likelihood of receiving all the micronutrients to keep you healthy. Antioxidants are especially important as they act to neutralize highly reactive species in our bodies, which could potentially harm the structure and function of our cells. Aim for a minimum of 5 vegetables and 2 fruits every day.
  4. Yoghurt:as a dairy food yoghurt is not only a great source of calcium, carbohydrate and protein but it also contains probiotics (live ‘good’ bacteria). These bacteria can help fend off harmful disease causing bacteria in our guts.
  5. Omega-3 fatty acids:Research has shown a significant link between the strength of ones immune system and the amount of omega-3 fatty acids in ones diet. These fats are great for boosting your immune system and can be found in the following foods: fatty fish e.g. salmon, tuna, herring, trout, mackerel; flaxseed; nuts and some oils. Try and include at least 2-3 serves of fish in your diet every week.
  6. Zinc: This mineral is found in foods such as red meat, fish, eggs and dairy products and works to supply key enzymes to help keep your immune system working optimally. These foods should be a regular part of your diet.
  7. Vitamin E:This is one of the most powerful antioxidants. You can get your dose of vitamin E from foods such as sunflower seeds, avocado, peanut butter, peanuts and almonds.

In essence, a well balanced diet, plenty of rest and a consistent exercise program is the best way to stay fit and healthy year round.

Vicky Kuriel
BSc.(Exercise Physiology), Master of Nutrition & Dietetics (APD), Sports Dietitian

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Health and Fitness

Exercise Recovery and Weight Loss

You’ve just completed a fantastic run or walk, you’ve been out in the cold and you are heading home to the warmth and comfort of your home. To take advantage of all the hard work you’ve just put into your session you now need to put your feet up and recover but you also need to get some food and fluid back into your body. So what should you eat and drink at this point?

This can be a tricky question at the best of times and complicated even more if you attempting to lose weight as part of your exercise and lifestyle program. This is my advice to you:

  1. Whatever you consume following exercise should form part of your next meal or snack i.e. you should not add additional snacks to your daily diet as a form of recovery. For example, if you exercise first thing in the morning, your usual breakfast is part of your recovery regime.
  2. Eat and drink as soon as is practically possible following exercise. This will aid in helping you recover quicker and therefore you will be able to exercise at an optimal level next time round.
  3. Include both a source of carbohydrate and protein in your recovery meal/snack e.g. a bowl of breakfast cereal with milk; a low fat yoghurt with fruit, a sandwich on Burgen bread with tuna and salad
  4. Although sports drink can be useful if rehydrating following an extremely intense or long session, water is your best option if weight loss is part of your goal. Drink at least one biddon of water following an exercise session and then continue to drink consistently throughout the day.

Vicky Kuriel
BSc.(Exercise Physiology), Master of Nutrition & Dietetics (APD), Sports Dietitian

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Health and Fitness

Calcium and osteoporosis

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body. Building strong, healthy bones beforeyour mid-30s (your peak bone mass) is the best way to prevent the crippling bone disease osteoporosis in later life. So are you getting enough calcium in your diet and what can you do to ensure you help your bones stay strong?

Osteoporosis is the thinning and weakening of bones and affects as many as 1 in 4 women over the age of 60. Men also suffer from it but in smaller numbers.

From a dietary point of view calcium is by far the most important nutrient to ensure you are getting adequate amounts of in order to prevent osteoporosis. Men and women should be aiming for 800mg per day. Post menopause this needs to be increased to 1000mg. Pregnant and breastfeeding women need to step their daily intake up to 1100mg and 1200mg respectively.

The best sources of calcium are dairy products i.e. milk, yoghurt and cheese. Most soy milk is fortified with calcium making it a good substitute for milk. Smaller amounts are found in sesame seeds, sardines, nuts, dark green vegetables and figs. We generally need around three serves of dairy per day to meet our calcium requirements. Examples of a serve include a glass of milk, a carton of yoghurt or a slice of cheese (25g). Most women obtain less than this as they frequently cut calcium-rich foods in order to reduce kilojoules and fat in their diet or because of a dairy intolerance.

Keep in mind that Vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption… have you had your vitamin D levels checked? More and more Australians are being found to be Vitamin D deficient. If you think you are not obtaining enough calcium in your diet speak to a dietician about possible food options or supplementation.

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Health and Fitness

Canola Oil vs Olive oil

Canola and Olive oils have a lot in common. They are both vegetable oils that contain a high percentage of healthy unsaturated fats and have similar health benefits. Calorie for calorie they pack the same amount into each gram, with each contributing 120 calories per tablespoon. They can therefore both be classified as high calorie foods and even though healthy they should be consumed in small amounts.

One of the differences between these two oils relates to their uses from a culinary point of view and more specifically to their ‘smoke point’. If you heat oil at a higher temperature than its smoke point, it causes the chemical makeup of the oil to change. This in turn can cause the release of free radicals, which have been implicated in a number of lifestyle diseases, including cancer and heart disease. More refined or light olive oils can be used for high heat cooking i.e. frying, however extra virgin olive oil should only be used at lower temperatures. Canola oil has a somewhat higher smoke point than olive oil and is therefore suitable for frying. In terms of flavour and particular culinary use, canola oil has a milder flavour than olive oil and for this reason is more appropriate for baking. Olive oil would be recommended for pasta sauces and salad dressing where the flavour of the oil itself may be desirable.

Dietary guidelines specify that you should get most of your fat calories from poly and monounsaturated fats, keeping your saturated fat intake to below 10% of your daily calorie intake. Canola oil is made up of 63% monounsaturated fat, 31% polyunsaturated fat and 7% saturated fat. Olive oil contains 78% monounsaturated fat, 8% polyunsaturated fat and 14% saturated fat. Both oils contain significant percentages of unsaturated fats and therefore assist in reducing ‘bad’ LDL-cholesterol and improving heart health.

In summary, both canola and olive oil are great options to include as part of your diet especially when substituting for butter, which is a high saturated fat option. Remember however to use both in only small amounts in order to obtain the health benefits whilst avoiding the excess calorie contribution.

Vicky Kuriel
BSc.(Exercise Physiology), Master of Nutrition & Dietetics (APD), Sports Dietitian

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Sweet and Sour Vegetables








Sweet & Sour Vegetables with Brown Rice

Source: Nicki Haynes, Step into Life Iluka

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Open Pita Bread Sandwich









This Open Pita Bread Sandwich with capsicum dip (or Tzatziki if you prefer), green capsicum, tomato and low fat cheese makes a healthy and tasty lunch. Capsicums are high in vitamin C, rich in beta carotene and foliate, assist in lowering blood pressure and break down cholesterol build up.

If you want to add a protein source to this sandwich, chicken breast is a great option.

This recipe is low in fat and a good source of protein.

Energy per 100g: 637kg – 152 Cal
Fat per 100g: 2.5g

This Recipe Serves 2.

Source: www.weightloss.com.au

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Mango and Tomato Salsa








Makes a great refreshing summer salad. Quick, Easy, Refreshing & Healthy.

Preparation time 0 – 15 mins.

Source: www.rawpleasure.com.au

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Tuna and Roast Tomato Pasta









Method:

Step 1 Preheat oven to 200°C. Line a large baking tray with non-stick baking paper. Place tomatoes, cut-side up, on tray. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of the balsamic vinegar and season with pepper. Roast for 10 minutes or until slightly soft. Set aside.

Step 2 Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large saucepan of boiling water according to packet instructions or until al dente, adding beans and broccoli for the last 2 minutes of cooking. Drain well.

Step 3 Toss pasta and vegetables with wilted tomatoes, olive oil, remaining balsamic vinegar, tuna, basil leaves and pine nuts (if using). Season with pepper. Serve immediately with basil garnish.

Source: Healthy Food Guide, August 2008

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Apple and Pear Pie









Base:

Base how to:

Process everything till thick and well combined. Press into a pie tin with removable base. Covering both bottom and sides.

Filling:

Filling How to:

Mix these raw ingredients together in a blender till smooth, pour over the base and garnish with thin apple slices an dust with cinnamon.

Refrigerate for 1hr. Best served cold with banana & cinnamon ice cream. Blend together frozen banana, honey and a little cinnamon, spoon on top.

Source: Tarnyia Harvey, Step into Life Swan View. WA

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Summer Fruit Salad





If you are looking for a healthy dessert that will also satisfy those guests looking for something sweet and tasty after their meal, well I have the perfect answer for you. This summer fruit salad has been a hit and is especially good following a BBQ.

Method

Grate the zest from the limes and juice them. Mix the sugar with 4Tbsp water and warm gently. Add the lime zest and simmer for 2 minutes. If any of the fruit seems a bit lackluster, in particular the blueberries, add to the hot syrup now. Allow this syrup to cool a bit, but not completely. In the meantime, cut the cheeks of the mango, and peel and dice the flesh. Mix all the fruit in a big bowl, splash in the lime juice and toss it all together with the now cooler lime syrup. Serve with natural yoghurt.

Nutritional Information
Per serve
Energy (Kilojoules) 376KJ
Carbohydrates20.2g
Protein2g
Fat0.1g

Not only does this fruit salad taste fantastic but it will give you a massive dose of antioxidants from which an array of health and anti-aging benefits have been attributed. Enjoy!

Vicky Kuriel
BSc.(Exercise Physiology), Master of Nutrition & Dietetics (APD), Sports Dietitian

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Egg white omelette with grilled tomato salad








Ingredients – Serves 2

Method

Prep time:10 minutes

Cooking time:20 minutes

  1. Preheat the oven to 150ºC. Place the tomatoes on a baking tray lined with baking paper and roast for 15-20 minutes or until softened but still holding shape. Once cooked, set aside and keep warm.
  2. While the tomatoes are cooking, place the egg whites in a large clean bowl. Beat with an electric mixer for about 2-3 minutes or until soft peaks form. Gently fold in the spring onions and half of the basil and parsley.
  3. Lightly spray a 20cm non stick ovenproof frypan with olive oil; heat to medium heat. Pour in half the egg white mixture and cook for 2 minutes or until the omelette is lightly browned on the bottom.
  4. Place the frypan under a grill and cook the omelette under medium heat for a further 2 minutes or until it has set. Remove from the grill; place half of the bocconcini on one side of the omelette and fold the omelette in half using an egg flip. Slide onto a plate and keep warm. Repeat this process to make the second omelette.
  5. To serve, place the roasted tomatoes alongside the omelette and sprinkle with a pinch of sea salt and pepper, and remaining basil leaves.

170 calories , 711 kilojoules, Source – www.thebiggestloser.com.au

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Warm Lamb Pasta Salad








Ingredients (serves 4)

Method

  1. Cook pasta in a large saucepan of boiling salted water, following packet directions, until tender. Drain.
  2. Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a large non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Add lamb. Cook for 3 minutes each side for medium or until cooked to your liking. Remove to a plate. Cover with foil. Set aside for 5 minutes to rest. Thinly slice.
  3. Combine parsley, mint, basil, mustard, capers, lemon juice and remaining oil in a bowl. Add pasta, lamb and capsicum. Season with salt and pepper. Toss gently to combine. Serve.

Notes

Source

Super Food Ideas - October 2007 Super Food Ideas - October

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Spicy Thai Sweet Potato Soup








This is a delicious, warming soup, ideal for the cooler days and evenings. For a heartier meal with extra protein and fibre add raw barley at the start of cooking. Ideal for freezing extra quantities for a rainy day!

Ingredients (serves 4)

Method

Nutritional Information:

and barley Per serve, basic recipe Per serve + goats cheese
Energy (kilojoules) 535kJ 879kJ
Protein 5g 8g
Carbohydrates 20.6g 30.05g
Fat 1.67g 4.5g

Garlic and onion have fabulous bug-fighting qualities whilst the sweet potato is rich in antioxidants to help keep you healthier during the Winter months. Bev Dorgan BHSc - Clinical Nutritionist

http://www.avanawellness.com.au/

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Healthy Fried Rice








Ingredients (serves 4)

Method

  1. Heat oil in a large wok over high heat. Add cabbage, carrot and capsicum, and stir-fry for 1-2 minutes.
  2. Add rice and cook for a further 2 minutes. Add soy, ketjap manis, cashews and half the spring onions, toss to combine.
  3. To serve, garnish with remaining onions and drizzle with extra ketjap manis.

Notes

Source: www.taste.com.au

Recipe by Chrissy Freer

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Vicki’s Favorite Smoothie





I find that many of my clients struggle with ideas for a quick, easy breakfast that is not too heavy but still tastes great. Over the years I have played around with many smoothie recipes and I personally think I have a winner with this one below. The addition of ‘flaxmeal’ thickens the smoothie up, giving it a great texture. Flaxmeal is also a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, it is high in fibre and gluten free. Flaxmeal is readily available in most supermarkets alongside the breakfast cereals.

Serves 1

Ingredients

Place the first four ingredients into a blender or into an appropriate jug if you have a hand blender. Blend until smooth. Add a teaspoon of flaxmeal and stir to combine. Leave for approximately 5 minutes to thicken before drinking.

Nutritional Information

Per serve
Energy (Kilojoules) 1205KJ
Carbohydrates 45.4g
Protein 12.8g
Fat 6.4g

Vicky Kuriel
BSc.(Exercise Physiology), Master of Nutrition & Dietetics (APD), Sports Dietitian

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Apricot Yogurt Slice








Ingredients (No. of Serves 12-16 slices)

Method

Preparation Time:15 minutes

Setting Time: 4-6 Hours

  1. In a large bowl mix together the apricots, muesli & coconut.
  2. Dissolve the 2 x 9g sachets of jelly crystals in 250 ml hot water and stir through the muesli mix with yoghurt.
  3. Press mixture into a shallow tin and place in refrigerator to set for 4 to 6 hours. When set, cut into slices.

Source:
The Biggest Loser Official Australia Site
www.thebiggestloser.com.au

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Waldorf Wrap








Quick and easy lunch
Serves 2

Ingredients

METHOD

  1. Combine chicken, celery, apple, pecans, spring onions and mayonaise.
  2. Spread Lebanese bread with dijonnaise.
  3. Pile chicken mixture onto bread and roll up.
  4. Cut diagonally and serve.

Source: www.nutritionaustralia.org

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Balsamic Bean Salad with Char Grilled Fish Fillets








A number of health benefits have been associated with eating fish on a regular basis. Not only is fish and excellent protein food, certain types of fish are a good source of omega – 3 fatty acids.

Serves 5

Method

  1. In a flat dish combine oil, ginger, garlic and cumin. Add fish and refrigerate. Meanwhile prepare Balsamic Bean Salad.
  2. In a bowl, mix together beans, cucumber, tomato and onion.
  3. Add vinegar, olive oil, herbs and pepper. Toss to coat well.
  4. Chill salad while grilling fish fillets.
  5. Preheat char grill pan, grill or barbecue until hot. Remove fish from dish and cook each fillet for 4 minutes each side or until cooked through. (When cooked, the fish flakes when tested with a fork).
  6. Serve immediately.

Nutritional Comment:

Omega-3 fatty acids are thought to be beneficial for a whole range of reasons, including the prevention of heart disease and certain types of cancers. Dried beans (legumes) are a good source of carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and fibre.

Source: www.nutritionaustralia

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Banana Marshmallow Magic








Snacks that are both tasty and healthy are always good to serve hungry bodies.
Serves: 1

INGREDIENTS

METHOD:

  1. Just mash a banana with a little lemon juice and mix in 10 tiny marshmallows.
  2. Spread on 2 slices of toasted raisin bread and grill until the marshmallows melt and start to go brown.

Nutritional Comment:

Banana’s are a great source of dietary fibre, vitamins C and B6.

Source: www.nutritionaustralia

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Below are some useful links to resources packed with useful nutritional and dietary information:

Dietitians Association of Australia - Smart Eating For You

AIS(Australian Institute of Sport) Sports Nutrition - the latest strategies in sports nutrition.

If you would like to gather more information specific to your goals and objectives, your Step into Life® Trainer will refer you to a qualified Dietitian.

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